It’s a strange time for everyone but being single and home alone doesn’t have to feel lonely. Yes, it’s important to virtually reach out to the people around you during self-isolation to fight the loneliness but why not take the opportunity to get to know yourself a little better? The dating scene may have changed these past few months, but there’s plenty you can do while waiting to delve back into the world of face-to-face dating. There's one person you can date at home now, and we think you’ll like them! Have you ever tried to self-date? If you find yourself with spare time on your hands then why not try self-dating? Thinking about and discovering what you want from yourself, a relationship and a sexual partner can be fun. 

‘Date yourself’ date night 

Date night isn’t just for going out. Plan your perfect date night in – with yourself. From your usual getting ready routine, to cooking a fancy meal and watching your favourite movie, you’re in the driver’s seat. End the perfect evening with some ‘me time’. With mood lighting, and the right music and atmosphere, whether that’s in the bath or in your bedroom, grab your favourite lube and end the evening on a high note. 

Love yourself first

Self-love is the motto for everyone. Take the time to work on the hobbies you never have time for or learn that skill you’ve been itching to try. It’s also time to do the tasks you would usually do for others, for yourself; whether that’s rustling up your favourite breakfast in bed, treating yourself to a bunch of flowers or enjoying some self-care. 

Discover the joys of DIY 

Now’s the time to explore your sexual side. With more time for yourselfenjoy some quality ‘me time’ and rediscover your own body. Whether you’re reaching for your favourite vibrator or lube, learn what feels good to youKnowing how to please yourself is the best way to know how to guide future sexual partners in the ways to please you too. 

The art of meditation 

Put the technology aside, turn-off the TV and enjoy some silence. Alone time gives you the space to clear your mind and mediate on what you really want out of life. That doesn’t mean answering the big questions, rather take a step back and review your emotional state, analyse past relationships and figure out where you want your future relationship to go. It’s about understanding what you did and didn’t enjoy about previous relationships and getting ready to try something different in the future. 

Get to know yourself  

Healthy relationships start with good communication, and that includes with yourself. There’s no reason to be embarrassed by your sexual desires. Spending time alone is the perfect time to discover what you like to do. Be open and honest about what you enjoy Come out of your sexual shell and masturbate with an try some different sex toys and lubesit could help you discover what you do and don’t like with future sexual partners too 

The art of flattery 

Compliments are easy to give and hard to accept, especially when it comes to complimenting ourselves. It’s time to celebrate all the things everyone else loves about you, and learn to love them yourself. Own the confidence boost – there might be some great things you love about yourself that others may have overlooked. Write ‘I have done lists’ rather than ‘to-do lists’ and increase your sense of accomplishment or send yourself a love letter celebrating your best features. Pay it forward by sharing what you value most about your friends and family with them. 

Our everyday lives don’t always give us the opportunity to spend time on our own and discover what we want and like. While you have it, take the time to explore your sexuality, and discover the things in life that make you happy. Being on your own doesn’t mean you have to be lonely. When you’ve had enough time on your own, reach out to your friends and family. There are a multitude of platforms out there you can use to connect. Whatever you choose, have fun, you deserve it! 

 

Similar Articles

include usage is not allowed in this context
include usage is not allowed in this context